NORTH POLE EXPEDITION TO OBSERVE CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS

North Pole Expedition to Observe Climate Change Effects

The Pax Arctica — North Pole Expedition 2011, in partnership with Green Cross International (GCI), departed from Longyearbyen, Norway today to the North Pole region, where they will observe and record climate changes in the region. Once on the ice, the team will interact with several teams of scientists to learn about observations done in the region.

The team will be blogging, tweeting, and facebooking live from the expedition. Findings from the North Pole Expedition 2011 will include pictures and video, and will form part of the inputs to various conferences and events all along the year.
“In this expedition, our objectives include raising awareness about the impact of climate change in the North Pole region in particular and in the world in general,” said Luc Hardy, founder of Pax Arctica and a member of the Green Cross France Board. “We also want to put a particular emphasis on the natural beauty of the Arctic region, and the need to preserve it from industrial activity and mineral exploration for future generations.”
Hardy will be leading the expedition along with Francois ‘Ben’ Bernard serving as the guide. Ben is one of the world’s most experienced polar guides and experts. He is one of only three in the world to have reached the three poles in complete autonomy (North Pole, South Pole and Mount Everest).
Alexandre Laurent, a dynamic 16 year old from France will be joining the team as the youth ambassador. “My teachers at Sidcot School in England are very supportive, my friends are either envious or thinking they would not be capable, and my little brother Julien has already asked me a hundred questions about what’s up there.”
“Pax Arctica is an important and valuable initiative to raise awareness about the impact of climate change on the Arctic and on the current state of our polar regions,” said Adam Koniuszewski, GCI Chief Operating Officer. “These areas are experiencing rapid changes and we need to act quickly to save the precious polar ecosystems.”

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